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20130124
20130201
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KQED (PBS) 28
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Jan 23, 2013 7:00pm PST
, saving money on your taxes and boosting your retirement security. here's finra's gerri walsh. >> with washington roiling from one crisis to another, many americans feel uncertain about the impact of changing tax rates and how to achieve retirement security in a fragile economy. but, especially at times like this, workers should focus on what they can control. no matter your tax rate, contributing to a 401(k) can help you save money on taxes and boost your retirement security. your contributions to a traditional plan are not included in your taxable income, and earnings on roth contributions are tax-free. the good news for savers is that in 2013 401(k) limits go up to $17,500, and employees aged 50 or over can contribute an additional $5,500. but, at the end of 2011, the average account balance in 401(k)s nationwide was just under $60,000. if you're not sure you're doing all you can to lower your taxable wages and secure your retirement, finras new 401(k) save the max calculator can help you do the math to find out. i'm gerri walsh. >> tom: join us tomorrow on twitter for a tweet-up, t
PBS
Jan 31, 2013 1:00am PST
were down considerably from last year thanks to a tax settlement a year ago. but the results were well above wall street estimates, thanks to a double digit jump in revenues. driving that growth was an increase in deliveries of commercial planes. the 737 remains the driver, with 105 planes delivered. the 777 also helped, as did the 23 dreamliners handed to customers last quarter, but those planes can't fly right now. u.s. and japanese regulators have grounded the 787 due to concerns about its lithium batteries overheating and catching fire. today boeing management said it is making good progress in finding the cause. peter arment is the aerospace analyst at investment firm sterne agee. >> tom: boeing still plans to ramp up production of that dreamliner, triple the number it delivers and takes payment for. how confident are you it can stick with that? >> we're very confident. i mean, yes, there is no question there is headline risk with the 787. i think that there is concerns about what the ultimate solution will be, or root cause. but everything we have seen, it is a battery defect. th
PBS
Jan 24, 2013 7:00pm PST
the republicans call nonsense because it involves raising taxes. i think you have to do bovment i think you have to have more revenue and you have to cut back spending. >> susie: let's say congress doesn't do that. what happens next? explain to people what happens next. >> i think the real risk is that we come to a showdown in march when the current stopgap budget ends and we face the government shutdown. people will lose services. people will lose jobs. and there will be a fiscal contraction, on top of the ones that we've already put in place. and that's not great for the economy, for sure. >> you know, and this whole conversation about a budget and the deficit and all of that. it's all about raising taxes and cutting spending. and there's no discuss about growth. and that is what americans really want. growth and jobs. what do we have to do to get growth? >> well, the badh6+suz there, susie s that while higher growth is by far the best remedy, it's very hard to put if into effect. in a sizable way. you need more investment in human beings, that's education and so on. you need mo
PBS
Jan 27, 2013 4:00pm PST
governor running a victory lap. proposition 30 passed. temporary taxes passed. the budget looks a lot better. i think this was the governor's chance to pivot, to pivot to talking about what makes california great, how we get them back on track. don't worry, we're getting there. so i took this as a real optimistic speech with a lot of details, a lot of brown history facts. and really a message i think not only to the legislature but to the public of, like, i'm watching it. we're going to be careful, but we're going to move forward. >> and, john, you mentioned he was very quirky in his speech. clearly the governor is enjoying his popularity right now and quoted everyone from philosophers and poets. let's take a listen. >> i'm sorry, say again? >> the most diverse, creative and longest standing mass migration in the history of the world. that's california, and we are sons and daughters. this special destiny never ends. it slows. it falters. it goes off the track. and ignorance and prejudice but soon resumes again. more vibrant and more stunning in its boldness. >> so, john, how has the s
PBS
Jan 27, 2013 5:00pm PST
does make tough decisions on taxes, on spending, on energy policy, that america has some credibility that we got it more right than wrong. >> tell me about the lobbyists. who are these people? >> well, the problem with lobbyists, a lot of them come off the hill, a lot of them come out of congress. many members of congress leave the capital and go to k street. and it's a real reflection of how money has overtaken politics. and the real problem with that system is not the individual lobbyists. a lot of times they'll have legitimate points to present to members of congress. the problem is the amount of money that lobbyists represent. and what tends to happen in congress is that the concerns of those lobbyists, the concerns of amgen, become much more of the topic of discussion, debate, and resolution than the concerns of middle america, the concerns of the farmers. you know, in congress, we didn't even vote in the house on a farm bill. this is the first time in the history of this country where a house agriculture committee, on which i sat, but in a bipartisan vote, we worked together, p
PBS
Jan 25, 2013 8:00pm PST
a new battle. >> we're now going to focus on the real problem, which is not that we tax too little but that we spend too much. >> the president's stared down the republicans. they blinked. gwen: the parties are over. now the hard part begins. covering the week, dan ball of "the washington post," martha raddatz of abc news, jeanne cummings of bloomberg news, and john harwood of cnbc and "the new york times." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we know why we're here. to connect our forces to what they need when they need it. >> to help troops see danger. before it sees them. >> to answer the call of the brave and bring them safely home. >> around the globe the people of boeing are working together to support and protect all who serve. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by prudential, additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation. the corporatio
PBS
Jan 31, 2013 12:00am PST
noneconomic stuff that's valuable. we don't have a carbon tax. and the -- >> rose: is its carbon tax the way to go. not cap and trade, but carbon tax jathe difference between those are not that critical. >> rose: the idea is put a value on how much carbon you use. there are reasons are to do that. but because of the political realities, either one can be achieved. they both have the same effect, causing you to shift in making your energy in a way. >> you look at germany, and angela mirkle has basically sworn off nuclear energy. >> that is aa setback -- >> rose: you disagree with the decision she made. >> well, with the current generation of reacts, because of the fukushima accident -- >> rose: they're old. >> people are now worried about that. there haven't been that many accidents, so you can have a reasonable disagreement about the current generation. there are generations coming that are inherently in their design form is more safe. if you don't like today's reactors you shouldn't group all the ways of generating nuclear energy that will come out. you shouldn't abandon those as well becau
PBS
Jan 29, 2013 3:00pm PST
a background check, paying taxes, paying a penalty, learning english, and then going to the back of the line behind all the folks who are trying to come here legally. that's only fair. right? so that means it won't be a quick process but it will be a fair process. >> woodruff: back in washington florida republican marco rubio, a member of the bipartisan senate group, still seemed concerned the president wanted to move too far too fast >> if this endeavor becomes a bidding war to see who can come up with the easiest, quickest and cheapest pathway to green card possible, this thing is not going to go well, folks >> woodruff: senate republican leader mitch mcconnell said he's withholding judgment for now >> i think predicting how one is going to vote on this package before it gets out of committee is something i'm not prepared to do. but i will say... what i will say is there is obviously bipartisan desire to move forward on immigration legislation. my assumption is the majority leader will be doing that. >> woodruff: that would be nevada democrat harry reid who said lawmakers must act
PBS
Jan 24, 2013 12:00pm PST
around israel for some time that a third of the people pay taxes, a third of the people work, and a third of the people go in the army and the problem is they're all the same third. ( laughter ) what you actually found now is people saying enough. the fact is you had-- bebe made a deal with kadima, created a broadbased government, and they were going to resolve this question of the haridi serving in the military and what the fair burden would be. and a commission worked out something and in the end, the prime minister decided that he felt that the character of that deal just was not one he could live with. i think that came back to haunt him in a fairly big way. so i think, number one, it's sharing the burden in a sense that if the country was going to go to the right the way it appeared to be, there was going to be no sharing of the burden. secondly, i think there is a sense of the main stream in israel feeling, wait, the character of likud, when benny baggan can't qualify for the list, when dan meriddor can't qualify for the list, the people who are on that list, they're not us. a
PBS
Jan 29, 2013 7:00pm PST
its lowest level in two years. economists say americans are worried about higher payroll taxes and the outlook for jobs. but despite that, the dow rose 72 points, the nasdaq fell a fraction, the s&p added seven points. after the market close, investors also shrugged off a disappointing earnings report from amazon and bought up the stock. amazon shares surged as much as 9%. it earned 21 cents a share, six cents below analyst estimates. revenues rose 22% but were a billion less than estimates. amazon's c.e.o., jeff bezos, said the company's e-book business is paying off, growing by about 70% last year and is now a "multibillion-dollar category." but he didn't say how many kindle fire tablets amazon has sold. still, jason moser, an analyst with the motley fool, says: >> really, i think that amazon is going to prove to be the leader here in retail-- not just online retail-- because i think retail in general is heading towards online retail for the most part, and amazon is really what is really setting the standard there. and that's why i think you see amazon performing so well today, and c
PBS
Jan 25, 2013 6:00pm PST
and tired of partisan gridlock. chambliss had angered tea party forces when he supported tax increases as part of a plan to tame the federal deficit. wall street closed the week with another rally. the dow jones industrial average gained 70 points to close near 13,896. the nasdaq rose 19 points to close at 3,149. the s&p 500 finished above 1,500 for the first time since 2007. for the week, the dow gained nearly 2%; the nasdaq rose half a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: we turn to israel, where prime minister benjamin netanyahu is working to build his coalition after tuesday's election. the contest saw a surprisingly strong showing from a centrist party led by a former television personality. margaret warner is in jerusalem. i spoke with her a short time ago. >> so margaret, a few days after the election what kind of government seems to be taking shape? >> jeff, i'm told that bebenetanyahu is trying to put together a very broad coalition, not relying just on the trawl religious and ultra conservative and settler movement crowd t
PBS
Feb 1, 2013 12:00am PST
in the senate, feel that it's way more important to further reduce the trivial inheritance tax on the wealthiest one tenth of 1 percent than it is to address the millions of unemployed who have needs that are not being met. and of course you could pair this-- (applause) >> in different ways. we really have to take stock of the fact we're not doing justice by our education system, by our infrastructure, by our research and development, by the policies that are needed to lift up the people of this country. and no government doesn't have to do everything. of course. we understand that. but you know, the idea of declaring the wealthiest few in the country, the job creators, well, the job creators are the people who either do or do not have money to go to the stores and purchase things and to do for their families. and when they can't the economy sinks. >> rose: i want to talk about all of those, whether the digital revolution, but with washington we just had an election. >> yeah. >> rose: president obama re-elected. we see now some movement towards immigration reform. >> yeah. >> rose
PBS
Jan 28, 2013 6:00pm PST
pay a fine, to pay their taxes, and then they would be here in a probationary status where they could not be deported. they could work. and we watched them as a number of other things evolve and progress under the bill. border security leading to green cards, leading to citizenship. >> woodruff: we hear some advocacy organizations saying, wait a minute. even that level of requirement is going to be a disincentive. they're not going to want to sign up if they have to pay a fine and so forth. >> well, i'll tell you. that's going to be part of it. we believe that these people who have lived here for so many years in fear and have tried to make a best of their lives and the lives of their families are prepared to earn their way into legal status and to citizenship. and the argument that they would not pay a fine and such, i really think that will not be a major obstacle. we went through this with the deferred deportation under the dream act. almost 400,000 people came forward. they paid the amount that was necessary. >> woodruff: we also are hearing, senator, from labor leaders who
PBS
Jan 23, 2013 6:00pm PST
now. they've been on the defense for a year on tax cuts for millionaires, on toughness, shutting down the government, they're not going to compromise. they need to recalbright here, a reset button needs to be pushed and it seems like in every aspect of government. and fight on future spending, not on obligations already incur. >> ifill: in the inaugural address this week, we saw the president lay out his gold for what he wants the next four years-- or the next year at least to be. what is the republican counter to that? >> i think the republicans have recalbrighted their tactics but not their end goals. they're in favor of cutting spending without new revenues. paul ryan this morning said no new revenues. the president has gotten all the revenues he will get. they have doubled down on spending cuts. they say they have a plan that will balance the federal budget in 10 years. you can only do that without revenues if you have really devastating cuts on all kinds of domestic programs and we'll see if they're willing to deliver on that. >> ifill: one democrat today and republican paul ryan
PBS
Jan 25, 2013 7:00pm PST
out of town. and interestingly, based on some spending cuts and tax increases that have been implemented so far, we're pretty close. and jack lew intimately knows what it takes to get from here to there. now, i think you, also, to, about other issues of the treasury's beat, international currency, financial markets, implementing the dodd-frank issue. as i mentioned, financial reform is still incomplete. so jack lew is going to have to oversee those as well. >> susie: let me get back to the budget issue. jack lew was also the architect of this sequester mechanism. a lot of people are worried if that kicks in, the automatic spending cuts, that, you know, that would really be a bad thing for the economy. some democrats are surprisingly saying maybe that's a good way to handle this whole budget cuts. where do you think jack lew stands on that? and, unfortunately, we just have half a minute left. what do you think? >> well, i think jack recognizes that if the sequester kicks in, it does two things. one, it makes deficit savings a lot more pronounced. that's $85 billion in one year
PBS
Jan 30, 2013 6:00pm PST
better. now that taxes are increased, we've got to see how they're reacting to that, but up until this point, almost everything pointed to stronger consumer spending and that i take as a positive sign. >> brown: what about just filling in a little bit more on the housing sector because those numbers came out yesterday, they look good, they were interpreted as very positive. but i note that even robert shiller himself sort of suggested that he can't read all that much into them. how important is that sector? >> well, to me i think housing is critically important, not simply because of whole construction which obviously powers an awful lot of jobs but when you consider all the people who have been underwater for so long and they have this negative wealth effect, we talked about the fact that 401(k)s are going up. if they see house prices going up they feel an awful lot better as well. so i think this strength in the housing prices are really the most important factor out there and it's spread really across the country. not quite as strong as what's going on in some of the areas that coll
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)